History!

Hello. I'm Ryan. I study History at Missouri State University.

We will now discuss in a little more detail the struggle for existence.

—Charles Darwin

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signs the Medicare Bill On This Day in 1965

When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law at the Harry S. Truman Library on July 30, 1965, he told the nation that it had “all started with the man from Independence.”

Harry S. Truman, LBJ said, had “planted the seeds of compassion and duty” that led to the enactment of Medicare, a national health insurance for the aged through an expanded Social Security system.

Truman was the first President to publicly endorse a national health insurance program. As a Senator, Truman had become alarmed at the number of draftees who had failed their induction physicals during World War II. For Truman these rejections meant that the average citizen could not afford visiting a doctor to maintain health. He stated:

“that is all wrong in my book. I am trying to fix it so the people in the middle-income bracket can live as long as the very rich and the very poor.”

Truman’s first proposal in 1945 provided for physician and hospital insurance for working-aged Americans and their families. A federal health board was to administer the program with the government retaining the right to fix fees for service, and doctors could choose whether or not to participate. This proposal was defeated after, among many factors, the American Medical Association labeled the president’s plan “socialized medicine” taking advantage of the public’s concern over communism in Russia.

Even though he was never able to create a national health care program, Truman was able to draw attention to the country’s health needs, have funds legislated to construct hospitals, expand medical aid to the needy, and provide for expanded medical research.

In honor of his continued advocacy for national health insurance, Johnson presented Truman and his wife Bess with Medicare cards number one and two in 1966.

-from the Truman Library

Agent of the Amsterdam municipal police eating from a can.

babylonfalling:

The Children of Vietnam-II, Ramparts (1970)

In January 1967, we printed a photographic essay on children of Vietnam who had suffered horrible disfigurement as a result of the American presence in their country. At that time we were criticized for “tastelessness” in printing stark images of their suffering—skin melted by napalm, sightless eyes, limbs shattered almost beyond recognition. Our response, of course, was that these children were victims not of bad taste, but of an unconscionable war. In the following feature, compiled by French journalist Claude Johnes, we are again taking up the subject. These children’s drawings and their brief, impressionistic thoughts on scenes from what has become daily life, show that violence of the war is subtle as well as grotesque.

1, 2, 3, 4

I need pity. I know what I feel. Great place and business in the world is not worth looking after.

—Oliver Cromwell

othmeralia:

Hey, haven’t I seen you somewhere before? Why, it’s Vice President Joe Biden at a 1980 press briefing with Hercules Inc. President A.F. Giacco. A major manufacturer of chemical products, Hercules maintained its home office in Wilmington, DE and here we see then-Senator Biden lending his support to the company’s newest expansion project. With many Hercules company photos still to process, I wonder where Delaware’s favorite son will pop up next!  

Photo credits: Hercules Inc. Image Collection (2012.017).

Confederate dead behind the stone wall of Marye’s Heights, Fredericksburg, Va., killed during the Battle of Chancellorsville, May 1863.
From: The National Archives

Confederate dead behind the stone wall of Marye’s Heights, Fredericksburg, Va., killed during the Battle of Chancellorsville, May 1863.

From: The National Archives

livelymorgue:

Jan. 9, 1955: Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th president, spoke to reporters and cameramen on his Gettysburg, Pa., farm. It was unclear if the president had confiscated this camera or wanted a photo of the scrum for himself. Apparently, he had a temper, evidenced in a 1969 article: “Once he topped a tee shot at Augusta and flared up in such anger that Richard Flohr, his Secret Service guard, grew alarmed. Mr. Flohr ran to the general and, in the manner of a top sergeant talking to a buck private, shouted: ‘Now you just cut that out right now, Mr. President. And I mean cut it out, or I’m going to put you in that cart and take you right back to the cottage and lock you in.’ ” His Gettysburg home seemed to have a mellowing effect. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

(via retrocampaigns)

unhistorical:

Maya Angelou (April 4, 1928 - May 28, 2014)

INTERVIEWER

James Baldwin… said that “when you’re writing you’re trying to find out something you didn’t know.” When you write do you search for something that you didn’t know about yourself or about us? 

ANGELOU

Yes. When I’m writing, I am trying to find out who I am, who we are, what we’re capable of, how we feel, how we lose and stand up, and go on from darkness into darkness. I’m trying for that. But I’m also trying for the language. I’m trying to see how it can really sound. I really love language. I love it for what it does for us, how it allows us to explain the pain and the glory, the nuances and the delicacies of our existence. And then it allows us to laugh, allows us to show wit. Real wit is shown in language. We need language.

More about the life and works of Maya Angelou

Adriana Ivancich and Ernest Hemingway beside a stuffed lion head at Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba. 
From: The JFK Library

Adriana Ivancich and Ernest Hemingway beside a stuffed lion head at Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba.

From: The JFK Library

oupacademic:


"After Europe plunged into war in 1914, he applied to the Old World the vision of America’s mission that [Woodrow Wilson] first offered to the Western Hemisphere. The rise of the United States in the global political economy and the collapse of Europe’s balance of power, which the First World War clearly revealed, provided the conditions for his redefinition of America’s global mission."

Learn more about Woodrow Wilson and the United States’ gradual entrance into the First World War in the American National Biography Online. 

oupacademic:

"After Europe plunged into war in 1914, he applied to the Old World the vision of America’s mission that [Woodrow Wilson] first offered to the Western Hemisphere. The rise of the United States in the global political economy and the collapse of Europe’s balance of power, which the First World War clearly revealed, provided the conditions for his redefinition of America’s global mission."

Learn more about Woodrow Wilson and the United States’ gradual entrance into the First World War in the American National Biography Online. 

(Source: darkryemag, via bobastig)

A New York Herald Tribune wagon and reporters in the field.
From: The National Archives

A New York Herald Tribune wagon and reporters in the field.

From: The National Archives